35: The Big Picture

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THE BIG PICTURE: Vietnam, 35 years later

Big Picture The bony component of the gluteal (buttocks) region consists of two pelvic bones (os coxae) joined anteriorly by the symphy-sis pubis and posteriorly by the sacrum. Each os coxa is composed of three fused bones: ilium, ischium, and pubis. The Big Picture 35 Why do dinosaurs excite our imaginations? Are they, as many ethnologists claim, a reminder of our sublimated pagan past, of a time when humans readily believed in monsters?


www.boston.com ^ May 7, 2010

Posted on 05/09/2010 4:28:34 AM PDT by VU4G10

Last Friday, April 30th, was the 35th anniversary of the Fall of Saigon and the end of the Vietnam War, and last Tuesday, May 4th, was the 40th anniversary of the shooting of protesting students at Kent State University. The Vietnam War and America's involvement in it affected the lives of millions for well over a decade, exacting a massive human cost with millions of deaths and countless injuries - both physical and mental - that plague many of those involved to this day. United States military involvement and troop strength grew rapidly after 1964 - at its highest level in 1968, with over 500,000 troops on the ground. The Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C. now bears the engraved names of 58,267 of those troops. It's nearly impossible to encapsulate an event of such scale in a handful of photographs, but here, 35 years after the end of the conflict, is my attempt. (47 photos total)


(Excerpt) Read more at boston.com ..

TOPICS:Editorial; Foreign Affairs
KEYWORDS:pictures; vietnamNavigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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1posted on 05/09/2010 4:28:34 AM PDTby VU4G10
To: VU4G10

Then 35 years of brutal communist rule, that made the War seem like a picnic.


2posted on 05/09/2010 4:30:29 AM PDTby Dallas59(President Robert Gibbs 2009-2013)
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The Vietnam War and America's involvement in it affected the lives of millions for well over a decade, exacting a massive human cost with millions of deaths and countless injuries - both physical and mental - that plague many of those involved to this day.

Brought to you exclusively by the Democrats.

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Democrats - leading the way in human misery and senseless waste.


4posted on 05/09/2010 4:51:02 AM PDTby wally_bert(It's sheer elegance in its simplicity! - The Middleman)
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Memories light the corners of my mind..


5posted on 05/09/2010 4:56:16 AM PDTby DJ Taylor(Once again our country is at war, and once again the Democrats have sided with our enemy.)
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Exactly. Why were “boat people” forced to board barely floating junks and risk the high sea in the hopes of finding a good hearted US ship to save them? Why would they leave by the millions? The media should have focused on that question, and the answer would have been as brutal as the “killing fields” of Cambodia, only they couldn’t blame the US on the brutalities that followed the end of South Viet Nam.


[Post Reply Private Reply To 2 View Replies]

Exactly. Why were “boat people” forced to board barely floating junks and risk the high sea in the hopes of finding a good hearted US ship to save them? Why would they leave by the millions? The media should have focused on that question, and the answer would have been as brutal as the “killing fields” of Cambodia, only they couldn’t blame the US on the brutalities that followed the end of South Viet Nam.


[Post Reply Private Reply To 2 View Replies]

Exactly. Why were “boat people” forced to board barely floating junks and risk the high sea in the hopes of finding a good hearted US ship to save them? Why would they leave by the millions? The media should have focused on that question, and the answer would have been as brutal as the “killing fields” of Cambodia, only they couldn’t blame the US on the brutalities that followed the end of South Viet Nam.


[Post Reply Private Reply To 2 View Replies]

Exactly. Why were “boat people” forced to board barely floating junks and risk the high sea in the hopes of finding a good hearted US ship to save them? Why would they leave by the millions? The media should have focused on that question, and the answer would have been as brutal as the “killing fields” of Cambodia, only they couldn’t blame the US on the brutalities that followed the end of South Viet Nam.


[Post Reply Private Reply To 2 View Replies]

Exactly. Why were “boat people” forced to board barely floating junks and risk the high sea in the hopes of finding a good hearted US ship to save them? Why would they leave by the millions? The media should have focused on that question, and the answer would have been as brutal as the “killing fields” of Cambodia, only they couldn’t blame the US on the brutalities that followed the end of South Viet Nam.


10posted on 05/09/2010 5:09:09 AM PDTby Wildbill22
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Whoa. sorry, bad internet connection resulting in multiple posts.


11posted on 05/09/2010 5:09:51 AM PDTby Wildbill22
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You can say that again.


12posted on 05/09/2010 5:11:31 AM PDTby Cringing Negativism Network(Palin / Rubio 2012)
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The big picture is the Lefties of today who were the red-diaper-doper-baby Hippies then, decided in their intoxicated stupor that our trying to prevent a Communist invasion into South Vietnam was bad. Bad America for trying to save millions of lives that would come under the deadly Communist rule.

Danganronpa v3. Well, America pulled out and of course the inevitable happened: the North Vietnam Communists invaded, took over, and over a million South Vietnamese were killed under its rule.

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The stupid comments following those pictures on the source page are amazing. Boston is truly lost. They want communism. Perhaps we should let them have it.


14posted on 05/09/2010 6:01:54 AM PDTby sig226(Mourn this day, the death of a great republic. March 21, 2010)
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Democrats - leading the way in human misery and senseless waste.

Wait for the fall of Baghdad...

...The RATS are giving the insurgents the timetable for our departure, giving them information for their overthrow plans.

15posted on 05/09/2010 6:21:25 AM PDTby SteamShovel(When hope trumps reality, there is no hope at all.)
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Did your “bad internet connection” self-click the “post” button 3 times?


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ping


17posted on 05/09/2010 7:03:33 AM PDTby stylecouncilor(What Would Jim Thompson Do?)
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'[T]he [American] media played a major role in the final downfall of South Vietnam. . . . North Vietnam [Communist] General Vo Nguyen Giap [stated] in a French TV broadcast that [the] 'most important guerrilla during the Vietnam War was the American press.'

And what of today's American media?

I think that Michael Savage -- who's pretty good with such things -- has defined the media's support of the enemy this time.

'The media have become the minarets of terrorism.'

The American media are the Islamists' most important muezzins.

18posted on 05/09/2010 7:07:15 AM PDTby WilliamofCarmichael(If modern America's Man on Horseback is out there, Get on the damn horse already!)
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The comments section is awful, owned by the lefties, though there are a few good comments in there. The best one is by a guy named Justin near the bottom. What impresses me about the pictures is that 35 years later they’re still trying to demoralize us and cast Vietnam as the Bad War. The psyche of the left requires that we be solemn and angry and ashamed when we think of Vietnam. But I think it was a good war, justified and winnable.


[Post Reply Private Reply To 1 View Replies]

“The stupid comments following those pictures on the source page are amazing. Boston is truly lost. They want communism. Perhaps we should let them have it.”

I agree there were an disappointingly large number of stupid comments, but there are also some wonderfully smart and compassionate comments about the truth. I particularly liked the one by Wintermuth a German who espoused about National Socialism and Communism and wondered about how long stupid ideas like those can truly last when capitalism and freedom are present and so obviously better..


20posted on 05/09/2010 7:12:08 AM PDTby Wpin('I Have Sworn Upon the Altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny..')
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Why do dinosaurs excite our imaginations? Are they, as many ethnologists claim, a reminder of our sublimated pagan past, of a time when humans readily believed in monsters? Or do they have a more current function, as potent symbols of our own fear of extinction? Is it a coincidence that dinosaur science, and the philosophizing that trails behind it, began in earnest in the mid 19th century, just when more thoughtful folks were beginning to question the ravages of the Industrial Revolution?
The racial memory and projection theories are both perfectly sound explanations of our ongoing fascination with the long dead creatures, but I have my own theory, infantile as it may be – we want to see one, pet one, maybe even keep one as a pet.

35: The Big Picture Clip Art


Proof? As soon as dinosaurs stomped their way into the popular imagination, popular fiction began grinding out stories of dinosaur/human interaction. Reports of dinosaur sightings regularly turned up in the excitable penny press (and still do in the more amusing tabloids). And while Jules Verne and Arthur Conan Doyle both wrote best selling adventure novels featuring encounters between explorers and giant lizards, the Loch Ness Monster myth (and subsequent cottage industry) sprouted up like a horned weed, energized by the startling creatures found in fossil beds. Jurassic Park is just the latest in a long line of dinosaur entertainments.
Is it surprising, then, that the hottest field of dinosaur study today is the study of the so-called feathered dinosaurs? The idea that a humble robin pecking at a garbage bag is actually a descendent of an enormous, freakish lizard offers those of us inclined to the mystical a live connection to the planet’s distant and awe-inspiring past. And it’s this potential for romantic daydreaming that the Royal Ontario Museum’s exhibition Feathered Dinosaurs and the Origin of Flight successfully exploits.
Packed with information and a truck load of beautiful fossils, Feathered Dinosaurs explores the key question in the bird-dinosaur controversy: are the feathered fossils uncovered by palaeontologists early versions of flightless birds, such as the emu, or are they dinosaurs covered in feathers? Furthermore, if the fossils are feathered dinosaurs, are they the fore-parents of birds?
Scientists have been debating these puzzles since the 1860’s, so don’t expect me to give you a final answer (although I did once watch a flock of finches attack a seed ball with a ferocity that was distinctly reptilian) – what I can conclude is that Feathered Dinosaurs, the exhibition, is delicious viewing.
The fossils, lifted from the apparently very busy quarries of Liaoning, China, are jewel perfect. Displayed individually in small vitrines, the fossils have a delicacy and clarity that will surprise museum goers who’ve gotten used to looking at half-visible and muddied shapes buried in dark rock.
Entire little creatures jump out from the stone, many of them frozen in mid slither. A school (school? What’s the word for a group of extinct aquatic creatures?) of tiny, long-necked dinosaurs swims by, tails bent like rudders. A small, football sized dinosaur fossil rests with its head curled on its front paws (paws? feet? talons?), looking more like a sleeping cat than an SUV crushing monster. A tiny, perfectly articulated turtle, about the size of three loonies, could be mistaken for a brooch.
The speculative models of the feathery dragons are no less impressive. If the scientists are right, these beasts strutted around carrying more colour than a Carnival float. Garish orange feathers crest over flanks of chartreuse feathers, with blue and scarlet feathers for trim. Chanel was right – bad taste is eternal.
My one complaint about Feathered Dinosaurs is dramaturgical. The exhibition opens with a spectacular bang - as you enter, a gaggle of giant, rampaging feather dusters lurch out at you, scary and magical. After that show stopper, however, it’s all fossils, text, video and much smaller, less dramatic models.
I loved the fossils and even read half of the text, but as I watched people bring their children through the exhibition, I realized (and heard, over and over) that the small kids were bored by the intricate fossils and informative narration. You can hardly blame the poor hatchlings.
The lesson here is one every huckster knows. Save your best material for last.
35:
~

Emerging painter Scott Pattinson originally trained to become an architect, but don’t hold that against his paintings. Pattinson’s newest series of abstracts, Rafter, are as exuberantly messy as a dropped palette (and twice as colourful).
It’s tempting to describe Pattinson as an action painter, a splatter, swipe and run artist - but his works are more considered than accidental, and betray hints of underlying (perhaps architectural?) structures. Imagine a stained glass window fed through a blender: you can sense that the pieces and bright bursts of colour once conveyed a form, but now that the original has been smashed, you’re left to marvel at the riotous pile.
And Pattinson really piles it on. Scarred, cross hatched surfaces are clotted with smudged pastels, inky black geometries are interrupted by curls of hot colour or nullifying white, and everywhere a battle rages between calming, flat stretches of neutral colour and indiscreet washes of unmixed, raw paint.
Modesty is not one of Pattinson’s painterly virtues. At times, the paintings look like they were painted with thumbs, fingernails, and toes. But modest abstracts are for hotel lobbies.

35: The Big Pictures


~

Trying to add up the many pieces in Emmanuelle Leonard’s unfocused multimedia work I Call On The Inquisition (Self Portrait) is a fool’s game (so, here I go).
That faux-literary title is a hint that Leonard is milking some sacred art-of-obfustication cows, and that the viewer is in for some pretentious twaddle. Leonard does not disappoint – her collection of pictures of herself in various media, handsome as many of them are, add up to a lot of poses with no real position.
My core problem with this work is its familiarity. Leonard depicts herself as a videogame character, and reminds me of Karma Clarke-Davis’s super heroine videos. Leonard displays a series of film stills showing herself in the midst of a violent confrontation, and makes me think of Paulette Phillips’s film installations.
I’m sure all of Leonard’s bits add up to something frightfully important, something to do with self representation, the ambiguous gaze, and unstable narratives, but if you’ve been anywhere near an art gallery in the past 15 years, you’ve already been down this yawning academic path, ad nauseum.

35: The Big Picture Cartoon

Where’s a giant, carnivorous down pillow when you need it?
Feathered Dinosaurs and the Origin of Flight
Royal Ontario Museum
Big100 Queen’s Park Until September 5
Scott Pattinson
Rafter
Gallery Hittite 107 Scollard Street Until June 18
Emmanuelle Leonard
I Call On The Inquisition (Self Portrait)
Pari Nadimi Gallery 254 Niagara Street Until July 2