Windows 10 Uefi Iso

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Rufus comes in handy when you need to quickly create a Windows 10 USB installation drive with an ISO. The tool is compatible with several PC platforms, including UEFI and Linux. It has multiple uses, such as, firmware flashing from an ISO or running low-level utilities. Take these steps to create a UEFI bootable USB drive with a Windows 10 ISO. Create Windows 10 bootable USB from ISO with UEFI support Download the Windows ISO file to your computer. AIO Boot also supports ISO downloads from the Windows 10 media creation tool, which can include both 64-bit and 32-bit versions.

If you have to install Windows 10 on a device using UEFI, this guide shows you two ways to create a compatible USB flash drive to complete the task.

When installing a clean copy of Windows 10, usually you connect a USB media to the device to launch the 'Windows Setup' wizard to continue with the installation process. However, if you have a computer with a Unified Extensible Firmware Interface (UEFI), instead of the legacy Basic Input/Output System (BIOS), it is crucial to use the appropriate media for the system firmware type.

On Windows 10, there are at least two methods to create a USB bootable media. You can use the Microsoft Media Creation Tool to download the files onto a removable storage with support for both firmware types (UEFI and legacy BIOS). Or you can use a third-party tool called 'Rufus,' which makes it easy to create a USB to install Windows with support for UEFI.

In this Windows 10 guide, we will walk you through the steps to create a USB flash drive that includes support for UEFI using the Microsoft Media Creation Tool and Rufus.

  • How to create Windows 10 UEFI boot media with Media Creation Tool
  • How to create Windows 10 UEFI boot media with Rufus

How to create Windows 10 UEFI boot media with Media Creation Tool

The best way to create a bootable USB media for an in-place upgrade or clean install of Windows 10 is to use the official Media Creation Tool available through the Microsoft support website.

To create a USB install media, connect a flash drive of at least 8GB of space, and then use these steps:

  1. Open Windows 10 download page.
  2. Under the 'Create Windows 10 installation media' section, click the Download tool now button to save the file on the device.

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  3. Double-click the MediaCreationToolxxxx.exe file to relaunch the tool.
  4. Click the Accept button to agree to the applicable license terms.
  5. Select the Create installation media (USB flash drive, DVD, or ISO file) for another PC option.

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  6. Click the Next button.
  7. (Optional) Clear the Use the recommended options for this PC option.

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  8. Select the correct language, architecture, and edition of Windows 10 (if applicable).

    Quick tip: If you plan to install Windows 10 on multiple computers running 32-bit and 64-bit architectures, use the 'Architecture' drop-down menu and select the Both option.

  9. Click the Next button.
  10. Select the USB flash drive option.

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  11. Click the Next button
  12. Select the flash drive from the list. (If the storage device is not available, click the Refresh drive list option.)

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  13. Click the Next button.
  14. Click the Finish button.
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Once you complete the steps, the Media Creation Tool will download the files and will create a bootable USB flash drive that you can use to install Windows 10 on devices with support for UEFI and BIOS.

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How to create Windows 10 UEFI boot media with Rufus

Alternatively, you can use Rufus, a free third-party tool that allows you to create an installation media with support for UEFI devices. You can use the tool to create a bootable media using an existing ISO file, or you can use the option to download the files from the Microsoft servers and then create the installation media.

Create install flash drive with Windows 10 ISO

To create a bootable media using an existing Windows 10 ISO file, connect a flash drive of at least 8GB of space, and use these steps:

  1. Open Rufus download page.
  2. Under the 'Download' section, click the latest release (first link) and save the file on the device.

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  3. Double-click the Rufus-x.xx.exe file to launch the tool.
  4. Under the 'Device' section, select the USB flash drive.
  5. Under the 'Boot selection' section, click the Select button on the right side.
  6. Select the Windows 10 ISO file from the folder location.
  7. Click the Open button.
  8. Use the 'Image option' drop-down menu and select the Standard Windows installation option.
  9. Use the 'Partition scheme' drop-down menu and select the GPT option.
  10. Use the 'Target system' drop-down menu and select the UEFI (non CSM) option.

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  11. Under the 'Show Advanced drive properties' section do not change the default settings.

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  12. Under the 'Volume label' field, confirm a name for the drive — for example, 'win10_20h2_usb.'

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  13. In the 'File system' and 'Cluster size' options do not change the default settings.
  14. Click the Show advanced format options button.
  15. Check the Quick format option.
  16. Check the Create extended label and icon files option.
  17. Click the Start button.
  18. Click the OK button to confirm.
  19. Click the Close button.

After you complete the steps, Rufus will create a USB flash drive to install Windows 10 on a device using UEFI with a locally available image.

Create boot flash drive downloading Windows 10 ISO

Rufus also includes an option to download the Windows 10 ISO file directly from the Microsoft servers, which you can then use with the tool to create a bootable USB flash drive.

To create an install media of Windows 10 with Rufus, connect a USB flash drive of at least 8GB of space, and then use these steps:

  1. Open Rufus download page.
  2. Under the 'Download' section, click the latest release (first link) of the tool to save the file onto your computer.

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  3. Double-click the Rufus-x.xx.exe file to launch the tool.
  4. Click the Settings button at the bottom of the page.

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  5. Under the 'Settings' section, use the 'Check for updates' drop-down menu and select the Daily option.

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  6. Click the Close button.
  7. Close the Rufus tool.
  8. Double-click the Rufus-x.xx.exe file to relaunch the tool.
  9. Under the 'Device' section, select the USB flash drive.
  10. Under the 'Boot selection' section, click the arrow button next to the 'Select' option and choose the Download option.

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  11. Click the Download button.
  12. Use the 'Version' drop-down menu and select the Windows 10 option.
  13. Click the Continue button.
  14. Select the 20H2 (Build 19042.xxx - xxxx.xx) option to download the Windows 10 October 2020 Update.
  15. Click the Continue button.
  16. Use the 'Edition' drop-down menu and select the Windows 10 Home/Pro option.
  17. Click the Continue button.
  18. Use the 'Language' drop-down menu and select your installation language.

    Quick note: If you are in the United States, select the 'English' option. Otherwise, select the 'English International' option.

  19. Click the Continue button.
  20. Use the 'Architecture' drop-down menu and select the 32-bit or 64-bit option (recommended).

    Quick tip: You can check the architecture of your device on Settings >System >About, under the Device specifications section.

  21. Click the Download button.

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  22. Select a temporarily folder to location save the ISO file.
  23. Click the Save button.
  24. Use the 'Image option' drop-down menu and select the Standard Windows installation option.
  25. Use the 'Partition scheme' drop-down menu and select the GPT option.
  26. Use the 'Target system' drop-down menu and select the UEFI (non CSM) option.

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  27. Under the 'Show Advanced drive properties' section, do not change the default settings.
  28. Under the 'Volume label' field, confirm a name for the bootable drive — for example, 'win10_20h2_usb.'
  29. Under the 'File system' and 'Cluster size' sections, do not change the default settings.
  30. Click the Show advanced format options button.
  31. Check the Quick format option.
  32. Check the Create extended label and icon files option.
  33. Click the Start button.
  34. Click the OK button.
  35. Click the Close button.

Once you complete the steps, the tool will run the script and download the Windows 10 ISO file. After the download, you can use that ISO file to create a bootable media to install Windows 10 on a UEFI device.

When you have the USB bootable media with support for UEFI systems, you can use it to start the 'Windows Setup' wizard to perform a clean installation of Windows 10 or an in-place upgrade.

However, since the 'UEFI:NTFS bootloader' does not include a digital signature for secure boot, you must temporarily disable secure boot on the motherboard firmware before you can boot into the setup wizard. Usually, you would complete this task from within the Unified Extensible Firmware Interface that you can access by hitting one of the function keys (F1, F2, F3, F10, or F12), the ESC, or Delete key as soon as you start the computer.

The only caveat is that these settings will be different per manufacturer and even by computer model. So make sure to check your device manufacturer's support website for more specific instructions. After the installation of Windows 10, you can enable the feature again.

More Windows 10 resources

For more helpful articles, coverage, and answers to common questions about Windows 10, visit the following resources:

If you work in IT (and/or you’ve ever read this site), you’ve probably created USB Bootable Media to reinstall an Operating System before. With Windows (since 2015 specifically), a wonderful tool called Rufus has made this process much simpler than it used to be, with a 4(ish) click process to go from downloaded ISO to bootable USB drive in a snap. Unfortunately, Microsoft made things a bit more difficult for us with Windows 10, Version 1909.

As I’ve mentioned in previous articles (here, here, and here), UEFI bootable media (at least with Windows and their Native Installers) requires a single FAT32 partition on the flash drive. This was difficult back in the Windows 8.1 days because our custom built compressed WIM files regularly exceeded 4 GB – the max file size for FAT32. To circumvent that restriction, I previously utilized some tricks with the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit to leverage (2) Flash Drives, one with the bootable media and the other with the WIM file. This worked. but it was very clunky. Fast forward to 2015, we (once again) were provided with the ability to “Split WIMs” – or more simply – break these files up into multiple (<4GB) pieces, allowing them to fit on a single FAT32 (bootable UEFI) partition. From this point forward, creating custom USB images became much easier. But what’s all this have to do with Windows 10, Version 1909 and Secure Boot?

Create Uefi Windows 10 Iso

In Microsoft’s infinite wisdom, the latest MSDN downloads of v.1909 have a single WIM file exceeding 4 GB. Why? Consider me stumped. Microsoft could have split this WIM up for us in advance, but they chose not to. But where does Secure Boot come into play? If you download the latest Rufus, and point it to a fresh download of v.1909 from MSDN, you will be presented with the following screenshot:

If you click START and proceed, once complete you will be presented with the following prompt:

Clicking More Information will take you here: https://github.com/pbatard/rufus/wiki/FAQ#Why_do_I_need_to_disable_Secure_Boot_to_use_UEFINTFS

Windows 10 Uefi Iso Download

So, what happened here? Long story short, Rufus is using a system called UEFI:NTFS to create this boot drive. Please check out and read their GitHub as it explains in detail what it does and why it exists (for this audience: its existence is to allow UEFI boot via an NTFS partition).

But why the need to disable Secure Boot? Again, check out this link for details.
(TL;DR – It’s not UEFI:NTFS’ fault. It’s Microsoft politics.) Got it? Great.
But isn’t the point of this article to explain how to bypass such a requirement? Read on.

Get to the point, already!
How can I skip the “Disable Secure Boot” requirement?

If you’ve followed one of my Customized Windows build guides before, you already know the answer to this. We’re going to do the following:

Windows 10 Uefi Iso File Download

  • Extract the ISO
  • Use DISM to split the WIM into 3.8 GB parts
  • Delete the original WIM
  • Use OSCDIMG to repackage the ISO
  • Run Rufus again, pointing to the new ISO
  • Successfully create a FAT32 Windows 10 v.1909 UEFI Bootable USB Drive

Let’s do it.

  • Download the Windows 10 Version 1909 ISO from MSDN. In my case, I’m going to download the “Business Edition”. The latest build posted at the time of this article’s writing is named “en_windows_10_business_editions_version_1909_updated_dec_2019_x64_dvd_d16597e9.iso”
  • Download the Windows Assessment and Deployment Kit (ADK) for Windows 10 Version 1903 (yes, 1903) from here.
  • Open the Windows ADK for Windows 10 installer.
    • Select and install Deployment Tools
  • Double click the Windows 10 Version 1909 ISO to mount it
  • Open the recently mounted ISO Drive Letter
    (D: “CPBA_X64FRE_EN-US_DV9” in my case)
  • CTRL+A (to select all) and CTRL+C (to copy)
  • Create a new folder off the C: drive named 1909Working
  • Navigate to C:1909Working and CTRL+V (to paste)
  • Open a Command Prompt as Admin
    • WinKey (to open the start menu) and type CMD
    • Right Click Command Prompt and select Run As Administrator > Accept the UAC Prompt
  • Change Directory to
    C:1909Workingsources
  • Run the following command to split the WIM into ~3.8GB pieces:
    dism /Split-Image /ImageFile:install.wim /SWMFile:install.swm /FileSize:3800
  • Delete the original WIM with the following command:
    del /f /q install.wim
  • Change Directory to
    C:Program Files (x86)Windows Kits10Assessment and Deployment KitDeployment Toolsamd64Oscdimg
  • Run the following command to create a new ISO:
    oscdimg -m -o -u2 -lCPBA_X64FRE_EN-US_DV9 -udfver102 -bootdata:2#p0,e,bC:1909Workingbootetfsboot.com#pEF,e,bC:1909Workingefimicrosoftbootefisys.bin C:1909Working C:en_windows_10_business_editions_version_1909-fixed.iso
  • Find your newly created ISO located at: C:en_windows_10_business_editions_version_1909-fixed.iso
  • You may close all windows at this point and clean up (remove) the C:1909Working directory.

Windows 10 Uefi Iso File Free Download

  • Insert your USB flash drive
  • Download Rufus and load up your new ISO:
    • Click the Select button and navigate to C: and select en_windows_10_business_editions_version_1909-fixed.iso
    • Ensure your Target Flash Drive is selected under Device
    • Ensure the Boot selection is listed as en_windows_10_business_editions_version_1909-fixed.iso
    • Ensure the GPT is selected Partition scheme
    • Ensure the UEFI (non CSM) is pre-selected under Target system
    • Ensure FAT32 is selected under File system
    • Click Start
    • Click OK on the warning prompt if you understand that all data on the flash drive will be destroyed

Windows 10 Uefi Iso Usb

Congratulations! You’ve just circumvented a silly Microsoft decision that made performing USB reimages with a UEFI device more difficult than it needed to be! Go forth and image your devices without the need to disable Secure Boot!

Windows 10 Uefi Download

It’s been too long! I should have a new walkthrough once Version 2004 drops in the next few weeks. We’ll have to see if Microsoft makes that version’s WIM greater than 4GB. 🙂